DraftDay to Close Consumer-Facing Daily Fantasy Brand

DraftDay, a small daily fantasy sports site operating since 2011, announced on Wednesday they will be closing their daily fantasy sports brand to players. Instead of offering games directly, the company will put its full focus on a business strategy developing software for the industry. In addition to providing games to players, the company that owns DraftDay also provides software for brands such as DraftStars (not to be confused with StarsDraft).

With its closing, DraftDay joins a long list of DFS companies that have left the market since the fast-growing industry started to be scrutinized in late 2015. Earlier this year, FantasyAces announced its bankruptcy while player balances were largely taken over by FantasyDraft.

Details of DraftDay DFS Brand Closure

DraftDay has no contests in its lobby and is not expected to offer any over the next couple months. MLB contests had not been live at DraftDay since the start of the season earlier this month. The lack of activity had some questioning the site’s future. The website will continue to be active until June 18th, where players will be able to make withdrawals.

DraftDay cashouts can be made through Paypal or check. If a withdrawal has not been initiated by June 18th, DraftDay will move to actively refund all balances. There are no cashout issues expected with the closing of the DraftDay player-facing brand.

Although DraftDay had its fans, they never competed seriously with top sites, especially over the last few years. The brand was an cult favorite of some in the Two Plus Two poker community during its early days — when daily fantasy sports had not yet to become a household name. And unlike DraftKings and FanDuel, DraftDay never received the huge rounds of funding enjoyed by the top two DFS sites. Even as early as 2015, DraftDay seemed to submit to the notion that they could compete with the upper echelon of the DFS industry.

DraftDay Future as a Software Provider

The DraftDay software was a favorite among users and supporters of the site, with some players praising the simple interface and unique games of the website.

DraftDay believes its new focus will allow it to continue to play a part in daily fantasy sports industry. In a statement posted on the DraftDay website, DraftDay stated, “we are very excited to focus our attention on our mission of producing best-of-breed daily fantasy sports software where we believe we have a natural edge, continuing to be a part of this exciting and growing industry.”

DraftStars, a daily fantasy sports site based in South Australia uses the DraftDay software for its contests. “The DraftDay software, popular worldwide, will continue to be developed and enhanced, and our B2B (Business-to-Business) offering will receive our full attention.”

They will be left to compete in a DFS landscape that has seen significant consolidation over the last two years. The two largest sites — DraftKings and FanDuel — are expected to merge later this year. After those two DFS sites, Yahoo Daily Fantasy and FantasyDraft and other smaller sites are left competing for what remains.